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Cheddar

Cheddar

What is Cheddar?

Sprung from the lush dairy pastures of southern England near Wells Cathedral, the legacy of Cheddar spans a diverse range of cultures and cuisines. Bright and mellow, this semi-hard cheese is made from cow’s milk and presents hearty tones of hazelnut and browned butter, often ending in a sharp and lingering finish.

Types of Cheddar

Determined by age, coating, cheese cultures and pasteurization, varieties of Cheddar differ greatly from each other in terms of both taste and texture. Flavors range from mild to sharp, with the difference coming from the cheese cultures used and the aging of the cheese. Younger cheddars start out mild in flavor, gradually becoming stronger with age. Some Cheddars have added further flavor by way of chilis, onions or cracked black pepper.

Partly tradition, partly preference, the orange hue seen in some Cheddars derives from the addition of ground annatto seeds. Annatto, the flavorless fruit from achiote trees found in South America, holds no significant taste or aroma, and has been used in cheeses for generations.

How Cheddar is made

In all aspects, Cheddar boasts immense versatility, meaning that the process of making it has endured many adoptions and variations. Common to all, however, is the process known as Cheddaring, in which loaves of curd are stacked on top of one another, causing excess whey to drain off. It is during this continual layering that the cheese begins to develop its characteristic flavor and texture.

Depending on the type of Cheddar, aging will take a minimum of two months and up to two years for Castello Extra Mature Cheese. During this period, the texture goes from smooth to crumbly, while flavors take on notes of hazelnut, and sharpen in aftertaste.

With annatto as the only real additive, Cheddar is clean in flavor and contains no preservatives or fillers, making it gluten free. Young Cheddars are often pasteurized, while aged variants sometimes are unpasteurized to encourage salt crystals to form. Using either animal or vegetable rennet, the production of Cheddar allows for both vegetarian and non-vegetarian variants.

Cooking with Cheddar

When cooking with Cheddar, thin slices provide an even coating, and ensure that all parts of the dish are covered. As a topping for baked dishes, the cheese turns crispy and golden in the oven, while a soft and stringy consistency develops when exposed to heat.

Grated cheese is best for quick and easy melting. For a satisfyingly crunchy texture, grated cheese will deliver the best results.

Storing Cheddar

Cheddar enjoys a long lifespan, especially when stored under the proper conditions. Once opened, a block can last 3-4 weeks in a refrigerator, whereas it can stay fresh for up to six months unopened. Although the crumbly and flaky texture suffers when subjected to the freezer, most Cheddar can survive 6-8 months of being frozen.

Substitutes for Cheddar

Finding the right substitute involves looking at the characteristics of the Cheddar that you want to replace.

Reproducing the nutty taste of young variants, Gruyère adds a unique spin as a stand in for Cheddar. The flavor is toasty, clean and with a firm and smooth texture, similar to that of mild Cheddars.

An aged Gouda closely matches the qualities of many sharper, aged Cheddars. With a deep aroma of hazelnuts, the body is crumbly, with a rich and salty flavor.

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