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Chevre

Chevre

What is Chèvre?

Covering a wide range of cheeses, Chèvre, or fromage de chévre, describes a proud and bold approach to making artisanal French goats’ cheese - one that has remained committed to tradition for generations. Enjoyed in its fresh variants, it is intense and earthy, with a tangy kick to finish. The texture offers a firm and slightly soft density, with some having a creamy and spreadable consistency. As the cheese ages, the tart aromas and flavours sharpen, becoming increasingly dry and complex. Similarly, the rind hardens, with the interior growing crumbly and dense.

Originally produced in and around the central regions of France, traditional Chèvre is heavily influenced by the climate and pastures on which the goats graze. Depending on its characteristics, a region might invoke flavours suited for white mould cheeses, while others produce milk best enjoyed fresh.

Pair the tart flavours of fresh Chèvre with honey, ripe pear and roasted walnuts.

How Chèvre is made

Like fine wine, the process of making traditional Chèvre is based on an idea of constantly promoting the raw flavours of the milk. Artisans rely on experience and the natural quality of the milk, ensuring excellence throughout the cheeses.

A blend of cultures and rennet are added to raw or pasteurised milk in large vats, helping the milk coagulate and form a dense curd. Once the curd has solidified, it is separated and drained of whey. Workers then ladle the broken curd into special moulds, allowing the cheese to rest and breathe. During this process, any remaining whey is strained naturally and with the help of a generous coating of salt. This brining enhances the flavour and prevents the growth of any unwanted bacteria. In the case of fresh cheese, virtually no aging is needed, while on the other hand some aged variants require up to 12 weeks of maturation before they are fully developed.

True to the principles of craftsmanship and ingredients, traditional French Chèvre contains no artificial fillers or additives – nor do artificial preservatives ever find their way into the production process. This ensures a gluten-free cheese of the highest quality every time. With the use of calf rennet, however, most Chèvre is not suitable for vegetarians.

Substitutes for Chèvre

Not defined by one type of cheese, the term Chèvre instead includes several French cheeses made using milk from goats. The key when looking for a substitute, however, is finding a cheese with a similar amount of tang and mild acidity.

The Greek delicacy Feta boasts a tart profile with a dry and lingering finish. The texture is smooth, albeit crumbly. Often enjoyed fresh, flavours deepen and intensify when baked, with its consistency becoming slightly softer.

When replacing white mould Chèvre, Castello White with Goats Milk offers similar tart flavours along warm tones of earthy mushroom and caramelised butter. Mixed with milk from cows, it has a creamy centre and a thin coating of white mould.

 

 

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